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It's Elementary - WEB 2.0 in the Elementary Classroom

Full Circle Associates (Nancy White) - November 3, 2006 - 3:29pm
Via Bronwyn Stuckey in Sydney, Australia, comes a pointer to this wonderful story from John Pearce, an Australian primary educator about his explorations with "web 2.0" tools. It's Elementary is a narrated slide show telling his story over a year, replete with links and examples. His thoughtfulness about his work, critical view and those small, useful hints are terrific! Just under 30 minutes - it kept my attention (which is really hard!) I'll admit, I was multitasking! Here are some of John's URLS: http://users.pipeline.com.au/~jpearce/ - John's Science Teaching site http://jpearce.suprglu.com/ his Suprglu page on science and ICTs http://mrpbps.learnerblogs.org/ his class's blog Tags: , , , , ,
Categories: Attendees

Robert Scoble and the Butter Knife Scratch

Blog Business Summit - November 3, 2006 - 7:54am
And now for a bit of lighthearted silliness and jocularity… During our “Grapes on a Plane
Categories: Other Conferences

links for 2006-11-03

The Last Minute (Duncan Rawlinson) - November 2, 2006 - 8:23pm
Yahoo! Autos Green Center Some sweet hippie mobiles. (tags: environment green cars)...

Maclean's sucks up to the U of A

MasterMaq - November 2, 2006 - 7:51pm
I don't know about you, but today I lost all remaining respect that I had for Maclean's magazine. The annual ranking of Canadian universities came out, and the University of Alberta placed first in the reputational ranking. Kind of suspect, don't you think, considering the U of A led the charge to boycott the rankings due to suspect methodologies. If there was any doubt about why the U of A and 26 other universities chose to boycott the ranking, I think it's gone now. Nothing says guilty like sucking up. If you'd like to see past results, the University of Waterloo has a handy page with all the data - not surprising considering they have ranked first in 13 out of 16 years the rankings have been produced. For its part, the University of Alberta stands by the earlier decision, though Provost and Vice President (Academic) Carl Amrhein said placing first "certainly feels good." I guess that's a fairly diplomatic answer. Maclean's  
Categories: Attendees, Speaker

Architectures of Control in Design

Full Circle Associates (Nancy White) - November 2, 2006 - 3:20pm
Via Stephen Downes comes a pointer to a pointer which led me here, to this interesting blog. Architectures of Control in Design. I'm very interested in the generative use of the tension between control and emergence. This blog gives me a great deal to think about in terms of control and emergence in my designs for online interactions/work/etc.
Categories: Attendees

Friends with Talent

Full Circle Associates (Nancy White) - November 2, 2006 - 3:08pm
Check out noise, Tomas Christensen's whimsical new children's book. Thinking about books for the kids in your life in the upcoming holiday onslaught? Here is an option. Now we return you to our regularly scheduled online interaction STUFF!
Categories: Attendees

Zune doesn't hate podcasting after all?

MasterMaq - November 2, 2006 - 2:45pm
It may be true that Microsoft's upcoming Zune device doesn't explicitly support podcasting, but that doesn't mean that you can't copy a podcast episode to it yourself. In that sense, it's a lot like any of the other Windows Media based devices out there. Until today, I was more worried that Microsoft and the Zune would snub podcasting altogether. No mention of podcasting in any literature, marketing, or other materials. No hope for future updates to the Zune to support podcasting. That sort of thing. Today however, Microsoft launched Zune.net and put my fears to rest: Zap! You’re connected to your best friend and send the new song your band recorded in the garage last weekend. Another friend gets the hilarious podcast your kid brother made at school... Emphasis is mine. See! They don't hate podcasting! Maybe there's hope for V2 after all. Zune.net  
Categories: Attendees, Speaker

Minnesota to launch solar wifi network

MasterMaq - November 2, 2006 - 2:08pm
Yay for wireless everywhere! Let us all follow the fine example about to be set by Minnesota. According to Web Worker Daily, the state is getting ready to take a major step into the wireless world (via Tris Hussey): From a state better known for wind chill and the latest in fur-trimmed parka fashion, a plan to create a wireless mesh network with nodes powered by batteries refreshed via solar panels is gathering steam. The solar panels being used are apparently the same type already being used for highway signs across the country. The battery system is theoretically capable of lasting nearly seven years between replacement. And all the hardware is promised to work even during the dead of winter, through snow and sub-freezing temps. Canadians take note! This sounds like the kind of technology we need to deploy here in our own cities. Apparently 300 residents are already testing the network (not currently solar powered) and a final decision on the project should be made on Monday. Wireless Internet access provided by an all-weather, solar-powered mesh network. Awesome. Web Worker Daily  
Categories: Attendees, Speaker

Dynamic multi-dimensional scrolling in Vista

MasterMaq - November 2, 2006 - 1:52pm
The launch of Windows Vista is drawing near, so you might be wondering if it is worthy of your hard earned dollars. Ask someone to tell you about Vista, and they'll likely tell you that it is more secure than XP and has much nicer eye candy. That's all well and good, but what you really want to hear is that Vista has dynamic multi-dimensional scrolling. No really, that's what you want to hear. Long Zheng has an awesome animation that compares the scrolling experience in XP with the new experience in Vista (if you're too lazy to look, essentially Vista does horizontal scrolling for you automagically). I can't say it better than Long: Is it a feature? No. Is it worth mentioning? No. Is it a selling point? No. Does it deliver a great experience? Yes. Assuming Vista contains many more of these little gems, you'll want to spend your money on the new operating system. Long Zheng  
Categories: Attendees, Speaker

Minnesota is deploying a solar-powered WiFi mesh network ... a model for more?

Larix Consulting - November 2, 2006 - 12:38pm

While I'm still dreaming of setting up my own WiFi mesh network, looks like the state of Minnesota is charging (pun intended) ahead with a network of all-weather, solar-powered WiFi mesh network devices:

No, that headline is not a joke by Garrison Keillor. From a state better known for wind chill and the latest in fur-trimmed parka fashion, a plan to create a wireless mesh network with nodes powered by batteries refreshed via solar panels is gathering steam. Kimo Crossman tipped me off to this article in the Star Tribune, which answers most of the basic questions about how it works.

The solar panels being used are apparently the same type already being used for highway signs across the country. The battery system is theoretically capable of lasting nearly seven years between replacement. And all the hardware is promised to work even during the dead of winter, through snow and sub-freezing temps.
From Web Worker Daily

This is certainly something to be applauded.  It's also something that if successful could be used in other places where even getting electricity out to far strung locations could be a problem.  While Web Worker Daily highlights the third-world, I think even something like this here on Pender would be pretty darn cool.

Tags: ,

Categories: Attendees

Sharing is Caring: Facebook Goes After Del.icio.us

Blog Business Summit - November 2, 2006 - 12:27pm
I couldn’t agree more with my colleague Jason Preston’s assessment that Facebook stands to take a big gust of wind out of Del.icio.us’ sails with its’ new “share
Categories: Other Conferences

What's hot in RSS readers: email

Larix Consulting - November 2, 2006 - 11:45am

Lee Oden as an article on WebProNews that should give all us RSS junkies some pause.  Lee looked at the RSS reader stats on FeedBurner lately and found something interesting: the number three way people get the articles from is blog is e-mail.  Yes, e-mail.  I took the data only for the last month, but you will see that FeedBlitz is a solid three.  Bloglines and a new-comer Pageflakes are the top two.

 Past 30 days
Bloglines
Pageflakes
FeedBlitz
Rojo
NewsGator Online
Netvibes
Firefox Live Bookmarks
My Yahoo
BlogBridge Past 7 days
Bloglines
Pageflakes
FeedBlitz
Rojo
NewsGator Online
Netvibes
Firefox Live Bookmarks
My Yahoo
FeedReader One Day
Pageflakes
Bloglines
FeedBlitz
Rojo
NewsGator Online
Netvibes
Firefox Live Bookmarks
My Yahoo
FeedReader


Update: There was some confusion about this data ... this is Lee's data.  My data looks like this:

 Past 30 days
 Bloglines
Newsgator
Lektora
Rojo
no ID
NetNewsWire
Firefox live bookmarks
Java-based reader
Jakarta
My Yahoo Past 7 days
Bloglines
Newsgator
Rojo
Lektora
No id
NetNewsWire
Java-based reader
Firefox live bookmarks
Jakarta
My Yahoo One Day
Bloglines
Newsgator
Rojo
Lektora
Not identified
Java-based reader
Jakarta
My Yahoo
NetNewsWire
Attensa

Given this update, you can see that my stats are very different.  I had FeedBlitz on my site, but I removed it.  Now I have put FeedBurner's e-mail service back up, so we'll see if that changes anything.  Frankly I doubt it because Lee's audience (SEO) is much different than mine (more Web 2.0).

While the results could be specific to Lee's site, I don't think so.  I have a feeling that folks are still in the "get my information in my inbox" paradigm.  For us in the business of providing content to people I think there are two things we all need to do.  First is to make sure that people can subscribe to your RSS feed via e-mail.  Next is to make sure your blog is mobile compatible.  This one isn't, but maybe I'll bug Joey about that.  If you're on a Wordpress blog I encourage you to install the Wordpress Mobile plugin.  I've put this on several blogs and it works like a charm.  If you'd like to see these in action check out Business Blog Consulting and Bloggers For Hire ... I installed the plugin on those blogs yesterday.

So while we might think (and know) that RSS and feed readers are cool, we have to recognize that lots of people are still focused on e-mail and work with that.

Tags: , , , , ,

Categories: Attendees

Why is my blogroll different from the blogs I read?

Blog Business Summit - November 1, 2006 - 8:59pm
A lot of people try to match their blogroll to the list of blogs they regularly read, which makes a lot of sense. But I like to think of my blogroll as an entirely separate list of links - they are the blogs that I recommend to other people. There’s a fairly subtle difference between the two concepts, and I get that there seems to be an inherent contradiction in recommending a blog that I don’t read, which is why it’s a lot more common to find a blog I read that isn’t on my blogroll. This is because blog discovery is still in its very early stages. I don’t think that search is going to be the mechanism for blog discovery. Search is a great tool for finding something you’re already looking for, but blogs are fundamentally nebulous, and it works a lot better to have a blog recommended to you than to go randomly searching for something with the right keywords. This is why blogrolls are so important - because aside from the brand-new and amazing MyBlogLog Communities, they are the only real mechanism for sharing new blogs. Since recommendations are far more powerful if you give fewer of them (If someone comes across a blogroll with six blogs on it, they’re more inclined to look at them than if they come across a blogroll that lists 140 different sites), I keep my blogroll short and diverse. This way, hopefully people will be encouraged to click out on my blogroll and find something new that they really like. And this is why my blogroll is different from “the blogs I read.”
Categories: Other Conferences

links for 2006-11-02

The Last Minute (Duncan Rawlinson) - November 1, 2006 - 8:23pm
Techcrunch » Blog Archive » Last.fm Relaunches with New Features (tags: internet music last.fm radio) Last.fm Launches New Features - Including Flash Player, Events and Free MP3s (tags: last.fm lastfm internet radio music)...

TechSoup - Wikis and Non Profits

Full Circle Associates (Nancy White) - November 1, 2006 - 6:18pm
I haven't had a chance to stop in yet, but here is an online event that may be of interest... SPECIAL TECHSOUP ONLINE EVENT – WIKIS AND NONPROFITSJoin us in the TechSoup Community, November 1-3, for a free, three-day online event about wikis, a powerful new collaboration technology that could change the way you work . Visit www.techsoup.org/wikievent You do not need to register, just show up to post and read the messages, in the TechSoup forums during the 1st-3rd of November and discuss wikis and how nonprofits can use them. This event will be hosted by Adam Frey of Wikispaces and other wiki experts, users and designers. We will answer questions like:*what is a wiki?*How do wikis work?*How would my nonprofit use one?*And how do I build or energize a community around my wiki? You will come away with practical tips, quick tricks, models, resources, and tools for bringing the collaborative technologies of wiki applications to your own organization. Bring your wiki questions and examples with you! We hope to see you there. http://www.techsoup.org/wikievent
Categories: Attendees

Canada to tax Income Trusts

MasterMaq - November 1, 2006 - 4:16pm
By now you've probably heard that Finance Minister Jim Flaherty announced today a new tax on income trusts. The decision has drawn lots of criticism, especially since it comes just three weeks after BCE proposed the biggest trust conversion in our nation's history. Telus was another major corporation looking to transform itself to an income trust. So what the heck is an income trust? That's been my question throughout all of this. According to Wikipedia: An income trust is an investment trust that holds income-producing assets. The term also designates a legal entity, capital structure and ownership vehicle for certain assets or businesses. Its shares or "trust units" are traded on securities exchanges just like stocks. The income is passed on to the investors, called "unitholders", through monthly or quarterly distributions. Interestingly, the article also points out that they are most common here in Canada. Anyway, that definition helps a little, but not a lot. When I heard that "BCE wants to turn itself into an income trust", I thought, "but they are a company?" So if I understand things correctly, they just wanted to save some money on taxes, and becoming an income trust would allow them to do so. And indeed, as the CBC article points out, BCE would have saved itself $800 million in taxes by 2008. That's some serious dough. Actually, it turns out the CBC article is more helpful in understanding things: Trust conversions are increasing in popularity because trusts do not pay corporate tax. Instead, they pay out most of their income in distributions to unitholders, who then pay tax on those distributions at a preferential rate. Clearly, the government was not happy that it would be losing so much tax money. Existing trusts have a four year grace period until the new tax takes effect, while new trusts face the new rules immediately. I don't know if this is a good thing or not. I simply don't understand things enough to say one way or the other. Certainly the markets don't like the new rules. My feeling is that companies like BCE and Telus simply discovered a weakness in the laws and sought to exploit it. The government realized it had a problem, and took immediate action. Which one of them is correct? I don't know. Tax avoidance probably isn't a good thing for the country, but on the other hand, the companies were not breaking any rules. I can only hope that Mr. Flaherty's rhetoric about income trusts hurting the economy is true, and not just a statement made up for his own purposes. CBC News  
Categories: Attendees, Speaker

Windows Media Player 11: Not Impressive

MasterMaq - November 1, 2006 - 3:55pm
On Monday, Microsoft released the latest update to Windows Media Player, affectionately known as version 11. Apparently the release was supposed to happen a week earlier, but was delayed due to concerns about the quality. They should have delayed the release even longer. I wrote about Beta 1 and Beta 2, and in general, the final release hasn't changed my opinion about the software. Here's what I like about it:
  • The interface is clean and looks modern and attractive.
  • Searching is excellent, and really becomes the main way you interact with your media library.
  • Synchronization with portable devices is superb.
And pretty much everything else falls into the "indifferent" or "don't like it at all" categories. They have tried to make the app easier to use, but as a result, they have taken out some of the functionality that advanced users such as myself want. The best example here is adding media to the library. I want to have explicit, tight control over what goes into my library and what stays out, so forcing me to monitor folders or play a file completely sucks. Give me multiple different ways to manage this kind of thing! What else: lots of visualizations are missing, there aren't any Canadian stores supported, sometimes it appears to freeze, and a bunch of other minor things. The biggest problem of all? Windows Media Player 11 is not an "oh my god you must get the latest version" kind of update to previous versions. As far as I am concerned, WMP11 is the first such release of Windows Media Player. I think WMP9 was an excellent improvement, and WMP10 was better still. It sucks that I can't say the same about WMP11. I was really hoping for something better. I guess I'll have to wait for version 12. WMP11  
Categories: Attendees, Speaker

Playing with Tag Clouds

Full Circle Associates (Nancy White) - November 1, 2006 - 3:18pm
TagCrowd helped me create this tag cloud for a draft of our Technologies for Communities report. It is really an interesting way to visualise it. I got the idea from Writing in the Wild. I should cross post this on our project blog (if I could recall the login! Oi! Multimembership is a bear!) #htmltagcloud{ font-family:'lucida grande',trebuchet,'trebuchet ms',verdana,arial,helvetica,sans-serif; line-height:2.4em; word-spacing:normal; letter-spacing:normal; text-decoration:none; text-transform:none; text-align:justify; text-indent:0ex; background-color:#fff; margin:0 0 2em 0; border:2px dotted #ddd; padding:2em}#htmltagcloud a:link{text-decoration:none}#htmltagcloud a:visited{text-decoration:none}#htmltagcloud a:hover{text-decoration:none;color:white;background-color:#05f}#htmltagcloud a:active{text-decoration:none;color:white;background-color:#03d}span.tagcloud0{font-size:1.0em;padding:0em;color:#ACC1F3;z-index:10;position:relative}span.tagcloud0 a{text-decoration:none; color:#ACC1F3}span.tagcloud1{font-size:1.4em;padding:0em;color:#ACC1F3;z-index:9;position:relative}span.tagcloud1 a{text-decoration:none;color:#ACC1F3}span.tagcloud2{font-size:1.8em;padding:0em;color:#86A0DC;z-index:8;position:relative}span.tagcloud2 a{text-decoration:none;color:#86A0DC}span.tagcloud3{font-size:2.2em;padding:0em;color:#86A0DC;z-index:7;position:relative}span.tagcloud3 a{text-decoration:none;color:#86A0DC}span.tagcloud4{font-size:2.6em;padding:0em;color:#607EC5;z-index:6;position:relative}span.tagcloud4 a{text-decoration:none;color:#607EC5}span.tagcloud5{font-size:3.0em;padding:0em;color:#607EC5;z-index:5;position:relative}span.tagcloud5 a{text-decoration:none;color:#607EC5}span.tagcloud6{font-size:3.3em;padding:0em;color:#4C6DB9;z-index:4;position:relative}span.tagcloud6 a{text-decoration:none;color:#4C6DB9}span.tagcloud7{font-size:3.6em;padding:0em;color:#395CAE;z-index:3;position:relative}span.tagcloud7 a{text-decoration:none;color:#395CAE}span.tagcloud8{font-size:3.9em;padding:0em;color:#264CA2;z-index:2;position:relative}span.tagcloud8 a{text-decoration:none;color:#264CA2}span.tagcloud9{font-size:4.2em;padding:0em;color:#133B97;z-index:1;position:relative}span.tagcloud9 a{text-decoration:none;color:#133B97}span.tagcloud10{font-size:4.5em;padding:0em;color:#002A8B;z-index:0;position:relative}span.tagcloud10 a{text-decoration:none;color:#002A8B}span.freq{font-size:10pt !important;color:#bbb} access activities available boundaries chapter community configuration consider content context different discussion example experience features focus group important individual information integration interactions issues learning level market meetings members needs organization orientation participation people personal perspective platform practice process resources role shared specific steward stewardship support technology tools used ways work Here is a second one, with up to 150 tags vs 50 and frequencies:begin tag cloud : generated by TagCrowd.comFeel free to modify as long as you keep this notice.This code and its rendered image are released under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial 2.5 License.http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/2.5/--> #htmltagcloud{ font-family:'lucida grande',trebuchet,'trebuchet ms',verdana,arial,helvetica,sans-serif; line-height:2.4em; word-spacing:normal; letter-spacing:normal; text-decoration:none; text-transform:none; text-align:justify; text-indent:0ex; background-color:#fff; margin:0 0 2em 0; border:2px dotted #ddd; padding:2em}#htmltagcloud a:link{text-decoration:none}#htmltagcloud a:visited{text-decoration:none}#htmltagcloud a:hover{text-decoration:none;color:white;background-color:#05f}#htmltagcloud a:active{text-decoration:none;color:white;background-color:#03d}span.tagcloud0{font-size:1.0em;padding:0em;color:#ACC1F3;z-index:10;position:relative}span.tagcloud0 a{text-decoration:none; color:#ACC1F3}span.tagcloud1{font-size:1.4em;padding:0em;color:#ACC1F3;z-index:9;position:relative}span.tagcloud1 a{text-decoration:none;color:#ACC1F3}span.tagcloud2{font-size:1.8em;padding:0em;color:#86A0DC;z-index:8;position:relative}span.tagcloud2 a{text-decoration:none;color:#86A0DC}span.tagcloud3{font-size:2.2em;padding:0em;color:#86A0DC;z-index:7;position:relative}span.tagcloud3 a{text-decoration:none;color:#86A0DC}span.tagcloud4{font-size:2.6em;padding:0em;color:#607EC5;z-index:6;position:relative}span.tagcloud4 a{text-decoration:none;color:#607EC5}span.tagcloud5{font-size:3.0em;padding:0em;color:#607EC5;z-index:5;position:relative}span.tagcloud5 a{text-decoration:none;color:#607EC5}span.tagcloud6{font-size:3.3em;padding:0em;color:#4C6DB9;z-index:4;position:relative}span.tagcloud6 a{text-decoration:none;color:#4C6DB9}span.tagcloud7{font-size:3.6em;padding:0em;color:#395CAE;z-index:3;position:relative}span.tagcloud7 a{text-decoration:none;color:#395CAE}span.tagcloud8{font-size:3.9em;padding:0em;color:#264CA2;z-index:2;position:relative}span.tagcloud8 a{text-decoration:none;color:#264CA2}span.tagcloud9{font-size:4.2em;padding:0em;color:#133B97;z-index:1;position:relative}span.tagcloud9 a{text-decoration:none;color:#133B97}span.tagcloud10{font-size:4.5em;padding:0em;color:#002A8B;z-index:0;position:relative}span.tagcloud10 a{text-decoration:none;color:#002A8B}span.freq{font-size:10pt !important;color:#bbb} access (50) activities (85) applications (30) areas (17) around (23) artifacts (25) aspect (20) asynchronous (21) attention (28) available (37) become (18) being (17) blogs (19) boards (23) boundaries (38) bridging (18) building (18) change (33) chapter (44) collaboration (23) combine (20) common (20) community (933) complex (26) configuration (51) connect (20) consider (42) content (39) context (44) contributions (26) control (23) conversations (32) create (30) cultivation (17) department (24) depend (21) designed (19) development (21) different (73) discussion (36) documents (25) domain (16) email (21) enable (20) etc (21) example (43) existing (32) experience (54) expertise (22) face-to-face (19) features (41) figure (28) focus (41) free (29) group (46) hosted (19) identity (16) implications (24) important (49) include (34) individual (85) information (40) instance (22) integration (56) interactions (70) interest (19) issues (35) key (20) knowledge (34) leadership (21) learning (62) level (39) life (34) likely (17) location (22) main (17) making (24) market (35) meetings (54) members (171) moments (21) needs (64) network (19) offer (33) ongoing (26) online (25) open (28) organization (57) orientation (74) others (34) participation (74) pay (16) people (78) personal (35) perspective (50) phone (22) platform (97) possible (21) practice (114) process (43) project (22) public (26) publishing (27) questions (25) rather (22) reflect (22) region (17) regular (17) relationship (23) report (20) requires (28) resources (59) role (46) rss (16) selection (19) sense (22) shared (50) skills (21) social (33) software (31) source (16) space (28) specific (40) steward (48) stewardship (45) strategy (19) success (16) suggests (23) support (73) synchronous (18) systems (31) tasks (16) technical (32) technology (367) tensions (18) terms (18) themselves (24) therefore (18) things (18) togetherness (22) tools (361) topics (16) types (20) unique (16) used (43) various (24) ways (52) web (29) wiki (29) work (55) Tags: , ,
Categories: Attendees

Even the CIA thinks wikis are cool, Intellipedia launches for spies

Larix Consulting - November 1, 2006 - 2:21pm

From Yahoo News, the CIA has announced that they have started a wikipedia-based international, inter-agency wiki for the intelligence community called Intellipedia.

While this might be spooky to some, I think this could be a big step for intelligence agencies.  Often agencies around the world have a hard time sharing and updating information.  The CIA sees that the collaborative nature of a wiki is perfect for being able to annotate and update intelligence information:

The office of U.S. intelligence czar John Negroponte announced Intellipedia, which allows intelligence analysts and other officials to collaboratively add and edit content on the government's classified Intelink Web much like its more famous namesake on the World Wide Web.

A "top secret" Intellipedia system, currently available to the 16 agencies that make up the U.S. intelligence community, has grown to more than 28,000 pages and 3,600 registered users since its introduction on April 17. Less restrictive versions exist for "secret" and "sensitive but unclassified" material.

[snip]

They also said it could lead to more accurate intelligence reports because the system allows a wider range of officials to scrutinize material and keeps a complete, permanent record of individual contributions including dissenting points of view.

The big question is whether the various agencies can drop the macho, pissing-matches they get into over who is more right or wrong and really use these tools to help them do their jobs.

Hat tip to Mary at That Damn PC.

Tags: , , ,

Categories: Attendees

More Post BBS coverage...

Blog Business Summit - November 1, 2006 - 11:49am
I hope I’ve done at least a halfway comprehensive job of finding posts about the Blog Business Summit. In case I missed anything, here’s the Google Blog Search. As always, feel free to bring posts to my attention if they’re not on the list:
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